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I was recently told about an interesting situation from a $1/$2 no-limit cash game that illustrates how to take advantage of weak, straightforward players who make their hand’s strength clear with their bet sizes. With $300 effective stacks, a player from middle position limped, as did the cutoff. Our Hero raised to $12 from the button with JT.

While I am fine with raising this decently strong hand from the button, I think both calling and raising larger, perhaps to $16, are also reasonable options. Calling keeps the pot small, often amplifying your postflop advantage (assuming you play well) while raising larger allows you to pick up the preflop pot with no contest more often. When you make it between $8 and $12, you will find that you almost never win the pot preflop, meaning you often have to flop well to have a good shot to win.



Short Stacked Mistake from a Poker Final Table

I was recently told about a hand from the final table of a live $500 buy-in tournament that illustrates a few key mistakes that many players make when playing short stacked. With blinds at 5,000/10,000 with a 10,000 big blind ante, everyone folded to the small blind who started with 120,000. He was the shortest stack at the final table, but there were a few other players with between 15 and 20 big blinds. The blind was a loose, aggressive player with 50 big blinds.

The small blind looked down at J3 and decided to limp.



Cards:

33

JT

Board:

KQ39

I was recently told about a no-limit hold’em poker hand that illustrates a key concept you must master if you want to succeed at the game. In a $1/$2 cash game, someone raised to $7 from early position out of his $200 effective stack and our Hero called on the button with 3-3.



I’ve been doing a series of articles on PLO, looking at some of the basics for new players. PLO is a big jump from No-Limit Hold’em, but if your Hold’em skills are solid, it’s an amazing experience that will benefit you as an all-around poker player. And best of all, it will even take your No-Limit Hold’em game to the next level, because you’ll be forced to think so deeply about concepts like outs and blockers, they will almost seem trivial when you return to Hold’em.

In my last article we talked about crucial PLO concepts such as position, blockers, and pot control. Today, I’m going to be talking about playing pocket aces, a (seemingly) trivial topic in Hold’em. Just get your money in, right? In PLO, it’s not so simple…


Hand Analysis
D&B MAGAZINE
Strategy
D&B MAGAZINE

Imagine you are in this situation:

You have T9. You are in the big blind. It’s folded to the cutoff. He’s a young guy. You’re in a $235 live event in Vegas. He seems modest. He wears a plain tee and normal jeans. He seems educated about the game, but he’s not lording his talents over others. He seems to be a well-adjusted guy in his late 20’s.


Hand Analysis
D&B MAGAZINE
Strategy
D&B MAGAZINE

I was recently told about a poker hand that illustrates a few detrimental errors many amateur players make on a regular basis. In a $2/$5 no-limit hold’em cash game, our Hero decided to raise to $10 out of his $350 stack with T4 from middle position.


Hand Analysis
D&B MAGAZINE
Strategy
D&B MAGAZINE

I was recently told about a hand by an amateur poker player that illustrates a few key errors many players make on a regular basis. In a $2/$5 no-limit hold’em cash game, our Hero raised to $30 out of his $200 effective stack with AJ.


Hand Analysis
D&B MAGAZINE
Strategy
D&B MAGAZINE

I was recently told about a hand from a $500 buy-in live poker tournament that illustrates an error many amateur players make on a regular basis. With blinds at 1,000/2,000 with a 200 ante, the action folded to our Hero in third position at a nine-handed table who raised to 5,000 out of his 75,000 stack with KKs-KdK.



This is a hand from last year’s PokerStar’s Caribbean Adventure where I was commentating. I will share with you a particularly sweet hand played by Daniel Negreanu. Daniel made it clear that he had been working hard on his game, and this hand clearly illustrates that to be the case.



I was recently recounted a hand from a $1/$3 no-limit hold’em cash game that illustrates a few flaws in the average small stake player’s strategy. With a $700 effective stack, Hero raised to $20 from second position at a nine-handed table with KQ


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